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Need access to OpenBSD environment to fix tests

by dmitri (Priest)
on Apr 27, 2014 at 21:14 UTC ( [id://1084039] : perlquestion . print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??

dmitri has asked for the wisdom of the Perl Monks concerning the following question:

I am the author and co-maintainer of RT::Client::REST, some of whose tests fail on OpenBSD. I need access to an OpenBSD environment (ssh access will do) so that I can figure out what is going on and fix the tests.

I asked the CPAN tester but unfortunately those machines he runs the tests on are off limits. Can one of you esteemed brethren help me out?

(This is not really a question, but I figured this is would be a good place to ask.)

Update: I signed up for free SSH account at devio.us. Thanks, marto!

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Re: Need access to OpenBSD environment to fix tests
by marto (Cardinal) on Apr 27, 2014 at 21:33 UTC

    If for some reason you are unable to create an OpenBSD Virtual Machine on a system which you have access to you could look for someone offering shell access. http://devio.us/ offer a free account which may be all you need, I'm not familiar with the module in question, it installed without error or any strage prerequisites under Linux.

      Thank you! I think this is exactly what I need. I'll post update to let you know how it works out.
Re: Need access to OpenBSD environment to fix tests
by atcroft (Abbot) on Apr 27, 2014 at 21:27 UTC

    Why not create your own in a VM, using something like Hyper-V, QEMU, VMware, VirtualBox, Xen, (whatever virtualization platform you prefer), etc.? That way,

    • you have complete control over the system (so you know what was installed, and any options given),
    • you can modify it in any way you desire (for additional testing), and
    • you have a reference system for later updates/changes.

    As a bonus, someone else does not have to go through their organization's internal hoops of getting permission to allow an outsider access to a machine on their network (which, depending on the organization, may be considerable and extremely lengthy-no matter how trustworthy the individual in question).

      > Why not create your own in a VM?

      Doing this would take longer than I'd wish to spend. Your points are all well taken, but really I don't want to spend hours installing an OS I have never installed or used before.

        Out of curiosity, on my work laptop (Thinkpad, Intel i5, 3GB RAM) the download of the ISO took <4 minutes (on fairly average broadband) and setting up the VM (including the additional downloads of the sets) took 7 minutes. Perhaps this would be time well spent.