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Re: LAMP is practical model?

by hardburn (Abbot)
on Nov 22, 2005 at 20:38 UTC ( #510893=note: print w/replies, xml ) Need Help??


in reply to LAMP is practical model?

The entire business? No, that's impossible. Every business is going to need at least some kind of accounting system (even if it's just a simple spreadsheet), and LAMP doesn't cover that at all.

Now, if you mean the parts of the business that are intrinsically tied to a web server and a database, then sure, there are probably lots of companies like that.

"There is no shame in being self-taught, only in not trying to learn in the first place." -- Atrus, Myst: The Book of D'ni.

Replies are listed 'Best First'.
Re^2: LAMP is practical model?
by wazoox (Prior) on Nov 22, 2005 at 21:51 UTC
    The entire business? No, that's impossible. Every business is going to need at least some kind of accounting system (even if it's just a simple spreadsheet), and LAMP doesn't cover that at all.

    Dolibarr is a free, complete and mature LAMP accounting system. My company has written its own LAMP accounting system. Probably some other did, too. Search again ;)

      My usage of "LAMP" is rather constrained. I use it to refer to simply the kernel, web server, database, and programming language typically used in the business. In terms of LAMP, anything not covered by the 'LAM' part will be custom-built with the 'P' bit of the acronym. But a company that sells stuff online would be silly to write its own accounting package.

      "There is no shame in being self-taught, only in not trying to learn in the first place." -- Atrus, Myst: The Book of D'ni.

        It actually depends heavily on your business. If the core competence in the company is writing software, it may be silly not to make use of it to build an accounting package that fits very precisely your needs and may give you a huge headstart on your market.
Re^2: LAMP is practical model?
by fokat (Deacon) on Nov 22, 2005 at 21:10 UTC
    The entire business? No, that's impossible. Every business is going to need at least some kind of accounting system (even if it's just a simple spreadsheet), and LAMP doesn't cover that at all.

    Well hardburn, I guess that this depends on what your definition of "cover" means... SQL Ledger is written in Perl, runs under Apache (mod_perl) and can use PostgreSQL. (more here and here)

    Still, I think you're right. There is much more to a business than the software architecture and there are certain tasks that are not that well covered in the OS world, so a ++ for you :)

    Best regards

    -lem, but some call me fokat

Re^2: LAMP is practical model?
by spiritway (Vicar) on Nov 23, 2005 at 06:07 UTC

    Depends on how you view "Linux" - is it just the kernel, or does it include the software that is often bundled with the distributions? The software contains several spreadsheets, such as gnumeric, Open Office's spreadsheet, and kspread. They're not as slick as Excel, perhaps, but they suffice for many smaller businesses.

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